67| Part 2 of —-31|Shin-Shin-To (Bakumatsu Period Sword) 1781-1867

Chapter 67 is the detailed chapter of 31|Shin Shin-to of Bakumatsu Period.  Please read chapter 31 before start reading this chapter.

30 Timeline (Bakumatsu)

The circled area is the subject of this chapter.

Swords made after Tenmei Era (天明 1781) till the end of Keio Era (慶應) is called shin-shin-To (1781).  This is the time the society was moving toward the Meiji Restoration, called Bakumatsu time.  During Bakumatu time, sword making became active again.  Below are the well-known sword smiths during this time from several main areas.

Musashi no Kuni  武蔵 (Tokyo today)

Suishinshi Masahide 水心子正秀----When he made Yamashiro-Den style, the shape is like the one of the Ko-To time; Funbari, elegant shape, Chu-Suguha (medium straight), Komaru boshi, fine wood grain.  When he made Bizen style, Koshizori shape, just like Ko-To Bizen Osafune, Nioi with Ko-choji.  It shows katai-Ha (Refer to  31|Shin Shin-to of Bakumatsu Period.   I saw Suishinshi on Nov/1970 and Oct/1971.

Taikei Naotane   大慶直胤 ーーーーThough Taikei Naotane was under Suishinshi group, he was the among the top swordsmith.  He had an amazing ability to forge all kinds of different styles of sword wonderfully.  When he made Bizen-Den style, it looks like Nagamitsu of Ko-To time with Nioi.  Also did Sakasa-Choji like Katayama Ichimonji.  Katai-Ha appears.  I saw Naotane in August/1971.

67 Naotane photo

Taikei Naotane (大慶直胤)   Photo is from “Token no Mikata (The way to look at swords)” written by Koichi Hiroi,  Published 1971

Minamoto Kiyomaro     源清麿---- Kiyomaro intended to work as a Samurai for Meiji Restoration movement, his supporter realized Kiyomaro’s ability as a great swordsmith,  he helped him to be a swordsmith.  But Kiyomaro drank a lot and he only forged a few swords.  At the age of 42 years old, he committed SeppukuKiyomaro was called Yotsuya Masamune because he was said to be as good as Masamune who lived in Yotsuya (part of Shinjuku today).  His sword has wide width, shallow curvature, stretched Kissaki, Fukura Kareru.   Boshi has Komaru Boshi.  Fine wood grain Jigane.

67 Kiyomaro photo

Minamoto no Kiyomaro (源清麿)   Photo is from “Token no Mikata ( The way to look at swords)”, written by Koichi Hiroi, published 1971

 

Settsu no Kuni    摂津の国   (Osaka today )

Gassan Sadakazu    月山貞一 ーーーーGassan was good at Soshu-Den style and Bizen-Den style, but he could make any kinds of style.  He was as genius as Taikei Naotane.  Because of his ability, when he made Ko-To style sword, it is hard to distinguish his sword and real Ko-To sword.   One needs to distinguish with the Ko-To like a sword made by Gassan and real Ko-To. He also had an amazing ability in carving.  His Hirazukuri-Kowakizashi forged in Shoshu style looks just like Masamune or Yukimitsu.  He forged Yamashiro style Takenoko-zori with Hoso-Suguha or Chu-Suguha in Nie.  He also forged Yamato-Den, Masame -Hada sword.

67 Gassan photo

Minamoto no Kiyomaro (源清麿)   Photo is from “Token no Mikata ( The way to look at swords)”, written by Koichi Hiroi, published 1971

 

 

 

 

66|Part 2 of – – -30 Bakumatsu Period History (幕末時代)

This chapter is the detailed part of chapter 30| Bakumatsu Period History (幕末)1781 – 1867.  Please read chapter 30 before start reading this chapter.

Edo period is from 1600 to 1858 (depends on how one divides the political history).   The latter part of the Edo period is called  Bakumatsu which is around 1781 to 1868.  During this time the economy started to stagnate.   The several Tokugawa Shogun (the different Shoguns of Tokugawa government at each given time) tried to perform the financial reforms.  At each time, it succeeded somewhat, but it never solved the real fundamental financial problem.   Tokugawa Bakufu tried to reduce government spending and forced people the frugal life and banned even a small luxury.  You know this only shrinks the size of the economy and things get even worse.  On top of it, they raised the going interest rate, thinking that may solve the problem.  This is the typical non-economist solution, the interest rate should be lowered in the situation like this.   Lower level Samurai became poorer and farmers revolts occurred often and many natural disasters struck in the farming area.  The famous Kurosawa Movies, “Seven Samurai” staged around this time.  As we all know, “Magnificent Seven” was Hollywood version of “Seven Samurai” based on Japanese “Seven SamuraiThe major actors were like Steve McQueen and Yul Brynner, they were wonderful in this movie.  Even though the time was not wonderful,  little by little, small cottage (or domestic) industry began to grow and that added to their income,  led by the local leaders and feudal domains.  Marchants became affluent and town people in the city became wealthier.  The gap between rich and poor became wider.  Especially the problem of Ronin (unemployed Samurai) became severe, it was almost dangerous level to the society.

The Edo town people’s culture

During this time, novels were written for ordinary people, instead of only for upper-class people like the previous time.  In the past, the paintings were related to the religion and only for the upper class, now paintings were drawn for the common people.   This is the golden time for “Ukioe (浮世絵).  Kitagawa Utamaro (喜多川歌麿1753-1800) is well-known for a portrait of ladies, Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849葛飾北斎) and Ando Hiroshige (1797-1858安藤広重) are well-known for scenery paintings.  Maruyama Okyo (円山応挙) drew a picture using European perspective method.  Also, Katsushika Hokusai’s daughter drew some of her paintings using the European method.  Her name is “Ooi, 応為“.Only a few of her works are left now, but it is said that even her genius father was surprised at her ability to draw.

Even though it was very limited, few people learned Dutch language (Dutch was the only country allowed to have a contact at Dejima in Nagasaki prefecture at this time) and translated the European medical book using French and Dutch dictionary.   It is called Kaitai Shinsho (解体新書).After this book was translated, history books, economy books, political books were translated.  New ideas emerged from those books and influenced the intellects.  In general, schooling was thriving.  Each feudal domain ran their own school for sons of their men, children of the town people went to a school called Terakoya (寺子屋a neighborhood unofficial school) to learn reading, writing, and arithmetic.

Pressure from the outside world

Even though Japan was in Sakoku state (鎖国national seclusion policy), Japan knew what was happening outside of Japan.  Since the early 17th century, Russia came to Japan.  1792 and 1804, a messenger from Russia came to Japan to demand to trade.  1808 England ship came to Nagasaki.  In 1825, Tokugawa Bakufu ordered to fire guns at any ships come close to Japan, but in 1842, when England won the Opium War against the Qing dynasty, Bakufu decided to help Food and fuel for the foreign ships.  We were afraid to have the same fate as Qing.  In 1846, the U.S. sent Japan a fleet commander to open the diplomatic relations but Bakufu refused.  The U.S. needed Japan to open the ports for the supply of food, water, and fuel for their whaling ships in the Pacific Ocean.  In 1853, a fleet commander Perry* arrived at Uraga port of Japan with four warships displaying the military forces and demanded to open the country.  Tokugawa Bakufu did not have any clear policy on how to handle the situation and also they realized it is difficult to maintain the seclusion policy any longer.  In 1854, “the Japan-U.S. Treaty of Amity and Friendship” was signed.  After this,  Japan made a treaty with England, Russia, France, and the Netherlands.  This ended over 200 years of Sakoku (national seclusion policy) and opened several ports for foreign ships.  Those treaties caused many problems.  One is; the treaties were an unequal treaty, second is; it caused the shortage of daily necessities, as a result, the price went up.  Also, a large amount of gold flowed out of Japan because of the exchange rate between gold and silver was lesser in Japan.  The exchange rate was gold 1 to silver 5 in Japan, but in Europe, it was gold 1 to silver 15.  On top of it, there was a problem who should be the next Shogun after Shogun Tokugawa Iesada (徳川家定) since he could not have a childAt the chaotic time like this, each opposing feudal domain wanted somebody whose political idea is the same line with your own.  Many other problems caused a big battle among feudal domains who were already opposed the Bakufu for different reasonsNow the base of Tokugawa Bakufu began to fall apart.  The Choshu-Han (Choshu domain) and the Satsuma-Han (Satsuma domain) were the main big forces who were against the Tokugawa Bakufu.   In the beginning, they were opposed to each other,  after many strained relations and strained incidents, they both decided to reconcile and went after Bakufu together.  Because England realized Bakufu did not have much power any longer, they started to become closer to the Emperor side, whereas France sided with Tokugawa.  England and France almost started a war in Japan.   Choshu-Han and Satsuma-Han (domain) realized it was not the time for Japanese to fight among ourselves. The process of the Meiji Ishin (Meiji revolution) time drama is the favorite historic drama Japanese like and we see it on TV and movies quite often.  The most favorable story is about Sengoku period of Nobunaga, Hideyoshi, Tokugawa Ieyasu, then 2nd favorite story is about Meiji revolution time of Saigo Takamori (西郷隆盛), Sakamoto Ryoma (坂本龍馬), and Shinsen-Gumi (新撰組).  Though it is a fiction but the movie, “Last Samurai “ staged at this time with a real historical character of Saigo Takamori.  Also, Kido Takayoshi (木戸孝允), Ookubo Toshimichi (大久保利通), Shimazu Nariakira (島津斉彬), Hitotsubashi Yoshinobu(一橋慶喜), and many more, they played the active role and they were the driving forces to topple Tokugawa and establish a new government system center around the Emperor of the Meiji revolution.  1867, Tokugawa Yoshinobu issued “the Restoration of Imperial Rule (Taisei Hokan, 大政奉還)”, this is to return the political power back to the Emperor.  1868, Tokugawa opened the Edo-Jo (Edo Castle) to Meiji Shin Seifu (new Meiji government).   Now it is called Kokyo (Imperial Palace), the present Emperor is living there.  Edo-Jo were lost by a big fire, but the original moat (swans are floating), big massive stone wall, a beautiful bridge called Nijyu-Bashi (二重橋) are there, and big garden areas are free to walk around.    It is right in front of the Marunouchi side of Tokyo station,  a walking distance from Tokyo station.

66 koukyo

Imperial Palace (From Wikimedia Commons, the free media repository ).  The copyright holder of this work hereby publishes it under the following license: Creative Commons attribution share-alike.

*Perry

Commodore M.C. Perry came to Jaspan two times.  In 1853, he brought the sovereign diplomatic document from the president of the U.S.  The following year he came back to demand the answer for the letter.  They wanted Japan to open 5 ports, Japan only wanted to open one port.  Perry studied Japan beforehand and realized the Japanese enjoy parties a lot.  He brought skilled chefs and loaded livestock on his way to Japan for the party.  He wined and dined the Japanese with whiskey, wine, beer, etc.  The Japanese side also did elaborate banquets for them.   Perry displayed the model train, the Japanese had a Sumo match, and so on.  The biggest hit was when Perry served a dessert (cake) with a small flag with each Japanese guest’s family crest printed on it at the end of the dinner.  Both sides came to an agreement to open three ports.  After Perry went back to the U.S. he wrote a book about his expedition, “Expedition of an American Squadron to the China Seas and Japan,  Under the command of Commodore M.C. Perry, United States Navy by order of the Government of the United States”.   In his book, he wrote about Japan very favorably, the beautiful scenery and people’s ingenuities, and lively active females.

31| Shin-Shin-To (Bakumatsu Period Sword 新々刀)1781-1868

 

30 Bakumatsu timeline                                 The circle indicates the subject we discuss in this chapter

The Bakumatsu is the later part of the Edo period.  See the circled area of the timeline above.  The swords made during this time is called Shin Shin-To.  They are also called the Fukko-To style (means revival sword 復古).  Fukko-To copied the shape of the sword, Hamon, Boshi, etc, of the Ko-to and Shin-to.  The characteristics of Shin Shin-To (新新刀) and well-known swordsmiths are those below.

The characteristic of Shin Shin-To

  • Katana, Wakizashi, Tanto, they all tend to be similar or copy of the previous shape
  • Many swords often have Hi or detailed engraving.
  • Unlike the previous time, one swordsmith makes several styles of swords, such as Soshu style, Bizen style, Shin-to style forging.
  • Often shows Katai-ha (refer 24Sengoku period sword.docx).

24 katai-ha                                                                         Katai-Ha

  • Weak (not tight) Nioi.
  • Yakidashi (2,3 inches above Machi) is often Suguha (straight line), even though the rest is irregular Hamon. Boshi is often irregular Midare.
  • Detailed engravings, but more realistic than the previous time.

Settsu (Osaka area)——–Gassan Sadayoshi (月山貞吉)  Gassan Sadakazu (月山貞一)  Gassan family are famous for detailed carvings.

Musashi no Kuni (Tokyo area)——Suishinshi Masahide ( 水心子正秀 ) Taikei Naotane (大慶直胤)    Minamoto Kiyomaro (源 清麿 )   Taikei Yoshitane ( 大慶義種) is famous for his carvings.

img075Minamoto Kiyomaro (源清麿)  Previously owned by my family

Tosa no Kuni (Shikoku area)————————————————–Sa Yukihide (左行秀) Satsuma no Kuni (Kagoshima area)————————————Oku Motohira (奥元平 )

Meiji Ishin-To

Right before the Meiji Restoration, long swords (approximately 3 feet) with no curvature were made.  Saigo Takamori (西郷隆盛), Sakamoto Ryoma (坂本龍馬) owned this type of swords.  Both are famous historical characters during the Meiji Restoration, called Meiji Ishin.  Both of them are a part of  Kinno -To group which supports the Emperor and renews the political system.

30| Bakumatsu Period History (幕末)1781 – 1868

30 Bakumatsu timeline
The red circle above  indicate the time we discuss in this chapter

The Bakumatsu period is the last part of the Edo period on sword history.  See the red circle on the center timeline above.  However, political history does not divide the Edo period and the Bakumatsu period.  It is not clear cut to divide the time.  The AzuchiMomoyam period (安土桃山) is between the time when Oda Nobunaga (織田信長) deposed Shogun Ashikaga Yoshimasa (将軍足利義昭) at 1573 and the time when Tokugawa Iyeyasu killed Toyotomi Hideyori, (Hideyoshi’s son) at Osaka Winter War at 1614.   The Azuchi-Momoyama period was a short period when Oda Nobunaga(織田信長), Toyotomi Hideyoshi (豊臣秀吉), and Tokugawa Iyeyasu (徳川家康) were maneuvering the intricate political struggles.  During this time, society was flourished culturally and economically.  After a long period of wartime, people could finally see the country is almost united and the peaceful society ahead.  The story of Oda Nobunaga, Toyotomi Hideyoshi, and Tokugawa Iyeyasu is the most popular story for Japanese.  Often the stories around this time are depicted on TV programs and in movies.  The Edo period was the time the Tokugawa family ruled Japan.

Tokugawa’s government is called the Tokugawa Bakufu.   Throughout the Edo period, the direct line of the Tokugawa family, usually the firstborn son, became a shogun.  Yet the emperor co-existed at the same time.  They did not have political power, however, the emperor’s family had some status their own as an emperor.  During the Edo period, it was a very peaceful time.  Unlike the previous time, there were no wars.  Yet, the long last Edo period (last approximately 260 years) became stagnated, started to show the ruling structure problems and financial problems in the latter part.  This is the Bakumatsu (幕末) time, which means literally the latter part of the Edo Bakufu.  As I explained in a previous chapter (Chapter 26 Edo Period History), Japan closed the country to the outside world.  The only place Japan could contact with foreign countries was the place called Dejima in Nagasaki area (Southern part of Japan).  During the Bakumatsu period, several European ships came to Japan asking, more liked demanding us to open ports for water and other supplies for their whaling ships.  Also, some countries wanted to trade with us.   Those countries were like England, Russia, America, and France, etc.  In 1853, Commodore Perry from the U.S. appeared with four big warships at a port called Uraga (浦賀: Kanagawa prefecture now) demanding us to open the ports for water, fuel, and other supplies for the U.S. whaling ships.  At the end of the Bakumatsu time, Tokugawa Bakufu was facing the political and economic difficulty in governing the country.  Also, intellectual people were afraid that we may get into trouble like the one in China, the Opium War(1840 -42) caused by England.  Russian government sent us the messenger officially to open up for trades (1792).  The pressures to open the county were building up and surrounding us.  It became obvious that Japan could no longer continue to close the country.  The time like this, Commodore Perry appeared at Uraga and demanded us to open the country.  These four big warships scared Japanese and excelled in the big anti-Bakufu movement.  The Meiji Revolution was ready to happen, and  Perry’s warships were the last blow.

Tokugawa Bakufu made treaties with several countries and opened a few ports for trades.   The Bakufu’s authority was lost, Japan was divided into several different political groups and they fought chaotically, the Meiji Restoration movement continued.  In 1868, the Tokugawa Bakufu moved out of the Edo castle in Edo (now Tokyo), and the Meiji Emperor moved into there.  The Meiji Shin Seifu (Meiji new government) started center around the Meiji Emperor and the Tokugawa Bakufu ended.

Commodore-Perry-Visit-Kanagawa-1854       File:Commodore-Perry-Visit-Kanagawa-1854.jpg      From ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/黒船 Public Domain

Commodore Matthew C. Perry’s visit of Kanagawa, near the site of present-day Yokohama on March 8, 1854. Lithography. New York: E. Brown, Jr.